Housemanship Induction

Kursus Induksi Pegawai Perubatan Siswazah UD41, Bilangan 2, Tahun 2011 di Hotel Putra, Jalan Tun Abdul Razak.

18 Jan – 21 Jan

(The writer is writing on the way back to Alor Star from Hentian Duta. The writer is most humbly PROUD to announce that she is going home by bus, at the moment. ALONE.)

 

The hardest thing about kursus induksi is the prejudice dread that one may feel in attending it. I was concerned – of course – about the less-than-acceptable accommodation facilities(remember BTN Ulu Tiram, anyone?) and the boring elements of the schoolroom material that we will be forced to listen to.

 

I never failed to fall asleep in some – if not all – of the talks given in the previous times that I had attended any form of induction.

 

But not this time, folks.

 

This time I did not fall asleep (that is not to say that my mind did not wander away every now and then. And of course, there were times when I tuned out a bit. But I did NOT fall asleep.)

 

The reason for my admirable self control had nothing to do with the exciting talks or materials presented to us, fresh graduates. It had everything to do with the fact that the moment I registered myself into induction was the very beginning of my being paid as a government servant.

 

I am now, a PAID Doctor. And I have the responsibility to make sure – to the best of my abilities – that my salary is halal. That I have earned it by doing what was expected of me. And at that moment my job was to listen to the lectures in induction, so I had no choice but to execute that order in the best way I knew how, right?

 

Let me tell you, dear readers, the burden of being a government servant is not lost on me. No more sleeping during lectures without feeling guilty. No more ‘ponteng-ponteng’ and then simply brush it off as being childish and naughty.

 

I am expected to act as adult. And my Gemini tendency of being carefree and forever-young is forced to catch up.

 

And catch-up fast and furious too! I can’t procrastinate no more.

 

Because I have been asked to report for duty this coming Sunday, on the 23rd of January 2011 to the Director of JKN, Kedah. Yes, that soon. Like, tomorrow soon.

 

I am also happy to say that the induction program that you attend as adult (ehem ehem) is vastly different from the one you attended during your school years. No more the horror of Ulu Tiram (toilet yang ‘canggih’ itu, Ya Rabbi); it’s Hotel Putra in Jalan Tun Abdul Razak this time, situated opposite to the IJN and next to the Hospital Pusrawi. So, the accommodation was really good and I have nothing bad to say about it. Furthermore,Riadah is not even sweat-breaking (in fact, we interpreted on our own what we meant by riadah and most of the time, it was spent in the group discussion for the drama that we had to perform on the last day). We were also provided with excellent food of 6 times a day(chubby cheek and round tummy will remarkably improve during the hours of housemanship, I hope) Last but certainly not least, there was also the very charming company of dedicated doctors who share your hope and your fears. A real sense of camaraderie, I tell you.

 

All in all, induction was not bad at all. In fact, it was as good as any induction can be reasonably expected to be.

****

 

The thing about being a doctor in Malaysia is the sense of belonging that I have lonnngggg fantasized to feel when I was down under. In Australia, you can feel alone and alienated even when you are surrounded by scores of Australian friends. They are only going to be as friendly as strangers

 

You can’t be friendly-friendly with someone whom you don’t share common ground with. You can only be stranger-friendly and make exhausting small talk with someone who goes to party (and you don’t), who find lewd things funny (and you don’t but you have to crack a smile anyway), who thinks (even subconsciously) that they are superior than you (of course not!! We mastered two languages and we are learning medicine in our second language, okay!), who already has his/her own set of friends with whom they share the same interest and pastimes (which you were never part of, through nobody’s fault).

 

I attended this induction not knowing anyone at all. None.And I am glad to say that making friends was so effortless. A walk in the park, a picnic by the beach and a piece of cake, all roll into one, making for an enjoyable time.

 

I walked into the lecture room and the dining hall with the unshakeable confidence that I belonged. I walked into the room convinced that I can talk with anyone without feeling like I have to make some rubbish small talk of a topic I have not a jot of care about.

 

This, dear readers. This! is the feeling I have longed for in all those years that I have been away. It matters little what people say about our health care system (which has a lot to be desired, I admit). It matters little when you compare it to the sense of belonging and the confidence that culturally, you do have the instinctive knowledge of exactly what to say to your patients anywhere anytime,.

 

And the remarkably easy bonding that you can form with someone you have only met for 3 days is amazing! Come home, and you will experience it.

 

But of course, it wouldn’t do for me to encourage future doctors to walk around in rose-tinted glasses when it comes to working in Malaysia. You know it’s gonna be hard. You understand it’s gonna be tough, But when things go wrong, you know you belong and the right people will help and support you.

 

My Placement

I was concerned at first that no one else in my induction batch got Hospital Sultanah Bahiyah (HSB) other than me. I mean, maaan…. I was hoping that I would be able to make friends with someone whom I can share the grief of working as house officer with. I walked around asking anyone whether they knew anyone who was posted in HSB. No one said they knew anyone with the same posting as me. But finally, on the very last day (well, on the very last hour actually) of the induction program, I met two more doctors who are posted at the same place as I; Dr. S and Dr. K. Thank God. We exchanged phone numbers and I look forward to meeting them at the Director’s office this coming Sunday.

 

In preparation for my housemanship, I have collected a few words of motivation to see me through the guaranteed hardships. And I would like to share them with you, my dear readers. Who knows how long will it get until I am able to write another post, right? So,I might as well leave you something beneficial in the mean time. Something that we can improve on and practice in our daily lives.

 

So here goes. Something for anger management and patience. :))

    The Prophet Muhammad (peace be upon him) said: “The best of you are those who are slow to anger and swift to cool down…Beware of anger, for it is a live coal on the heart of the descendants of Adam.”– Al-Tirmidhi, Hadith 1331

     

    “(The righteous) are those who spend generously (in the way of God), whether they are in prosperity or in adversity, who control their anger and forgive other people, for God loves those who do good.”– The Holy Quran, 3:134

     

    A man said to the Prophet (pbuh), “Advise me!” The Prophet said, “Do not become angry and furious.” The man asked (the same) again and again, and the Prophet said in each case, “Do not become angry and furious.” Hadith – Sahih Al-Bukhari 8.137

     

    It is said that he (sallallahu aleihi wa sallam) mentioned anger, saying, “Some are swift to anger and swift to cool down, the one characteristic making up for the other; some are slow to anger and slow to cool down, the one characteristic making up for the other; but the best of you are those who are slow to anger and swift to cool down, and the worst of you are those who are swift to anger and slow to cool down.” He continued, “Beware of anger, for it is a live coal on the heart of the descendant of Adam. Do you not notice the swelling of the veins of his neck and the redness of his eyes? So when anyone experiences anything of that nature he should lie down and cleave to the earth.”

     

    Abdullâh ibn Mubârak (rahimahullâh) would say, “The world is the believer’s prison. The best action in the prison is patience and control of one’s anger. The believer has no country in the world, His land will be there tomorrow in the Afterlife.”

     

    “And verily, whosoever shows patience and forgives, that would truly be from the things recommended by Allah.” (42:43)

     

    “Seek help in patience and As-Salat (the prayer). Truly, Allah is with As-Sabirun (the patient).” (2:153)

     

     

    The take home message is: When yelled at and scolded by your MO or any other of your superiors, privately or otherwise…. just have patience. Don’t be furious. Don’t be angry. Just apologize and move on. And pray that your superiors will someday learn and internalize the virtues in the quotes above.

     

    Until the next post, folks. Pray for me.

    Salam and take care.

    8 thoughts on “Housemanship Induction

    1. “You can’t be friendly-friendly with someone whom you don’t share common ground with. You can only be stranger-friendly and make exhausting small talk with someone who goes to party (and you don’t), who find lewd things funny (and you don’t but you have to crack a smile anyway), who thinks (even subconsciously) that they are superior than you (of course not!! We mastered two languages and we are learning medicine in our second language, okay!), who already has his/her own set of friends with whom they share the same interest and pastimes (which you were never part of, through nobody’s fault).”

      the very accurate description of what is the definition of ‘friend’ in australia. it’s f**king fake.

      Like

    2. Interesting to hear your perspective about med in Malaysia and in Australia, and med student vs paid doctor haha. It is indeed difficult to be real friends with people you don’t share the same values with but then not all Australians love drinking and crude jokes. Wish you all the best in your new job!

      Like

    3. I know not all Australians love drinking and crude jokes. I am usually able to make friends with devout Christians….I find that they understand us Muslims better. Conversation with them are rarely forced and artificial…. no pressure of trying to keep it light and crack jokes every single time.

      What I long for is the freedom to converse on something that truly matters without making me feel like I am too serious….and I find that I cannot do that with MOST Australians. There’s always the pressure to keep it light and keep it simple; the louder the laughter, the better…..yup, small talk. Hate that.

      Like

    4. Denesh

      Hi there,
      I’m Dr.D and I have applied for HSB as well.. hope to see you there soon. Anyway, i would like to know if you can claim airline ticket from the gov. for the travel to induction. Thanks

      Like

    5. Hello there Dr. D.

      I doubt you will see me around HSB anytime soon. I am doing OnG now. And my advice to you is: don’t start with OnG. Don’t, oh, don’t.

      You are not eligible to claim your airline ticket TO the induction because you are not yet a government servant. But once you actually registered yourself into the induction, only then you have begun to be recognized as government servant. So you are allowed to claim your airline ticket FROM the induction to travel back home. But not your airline ticket from your home to your induction place.
      Hope that helps, Denesh.

      Like

    6. Hanani

      Hello there. Thanks for the useful entry.

      Anyway, i’m currently waiting for HO to start. Im wondering, in your case, since you know your placement on the 18th and was asked to report duty on the 23rd, did you have time to look for accomodation?

      Thanks!

      Like

    7. Salam there Hanani,

      Yes, accommodation is a biggie. It’s a pretty rush-job for moSt HOs starting their career in other places that are not their hometown. Most of them end up in the hospital hostels, of course. You are not given any extra time to search for any other accommodation. This is where having helpful relatives or friends are useful. Otherwise, you have to accept the fate of most HOs – hostel it is.😉

      In my case, I asked for Alor Star..which is my hometown. So, I am currently at home with my beloved parents.

      Like

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